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Monthly Archives: December 2017

Overexposing and Underexposing

Ways to correct underexposure:

• Add more light to your canvas. One of the more simple ways of doing this is actually just turning your flash on, that is what it is there for so use it. Another way is by adding a reflector; this will help keep the lighting in the photo in a way that adds more definition to the scene or image.
• Adjusting your f/stop could very well be the problem too. Changing this will allow more light exposure to the photo, so just play with it until you find the right f/stop.
• Or change your shutter speed while keeping the f/stop the same. I only recommend doing this if you have a model that is not moving and you are using a trip pod. Switching your shutter speed from 1/60 of a second to 1/30 can really make a noticeable difference; it might feel like it’s only changing a millisecond but that period of time can make all the difference!

Overexposure is exactly the opposite of underexposure, you are letting too much light be recorded by the camera and that is causing the photo to be ‘blown out’ or ‘white washed’. When this happens, you lose a lot of the color in the photo and it can be too distracting to see what the photographer was trying to create. Some people overexpose on purpose to allow more details to emerge on a dark object and setting, but typically overexposing is not a good thing. Just like the definition of overexposing is the opposite of underexposing, the ways to correct overexposing are also the opposite.

• Take away light by moving to the shade or using a darker reflector. A darker reflector will absorb some of the access light, therefore, helping your photo from getting blah-looking. If you cannot find shade then find a cloth or something to block direct sunlight.
• Try changing your f/stop. Play around with it and get closer to f/11, see what works for the shot and use it.
• Shutter speed is another option. Move it up this time, go to 1/125 to let less light in to your sensor or film plane.

Get Ready for A Studio Photoshoot

The main light has to be placed in a very specific position in comparison to the model. The angle, height, and distance of the main light are vital to getting the right look. You do not want this light in the models eyes or from a side angle. It also needs to be placed at a good height so you are not casting shadows on the models face. With this light you need to use a diffuser or a soft box to help decrease the darkness of the shadows in the picture.

A hair light is a second light that sits in a specific position. Basically, the hair light is placed behind the model for a few reasons. To use this light correctly attach a snoot to it. A snoot is an attachment to the light that helps direct the light to a specific spot on the model; in this case it is for the hair.

The camera, you need to connect your camera with the studio lights so everything flashes in the right connections. There are a couple of was to handle the camera for a photo shoot. One of the ways is to put it on a tripod and keep the camera stationary. By doing that you will help eliminate blur and you can find a sweet spot to stay at. Another way is by just holding the camera and creating different angles while the shoot is happening.

The reflector is used to bounce light onto the models features from the main light. There are a few different types of reflector; you could use a white, black, gold and silver colored reflector. You would want to use a white reflector when the area you are taking a picture in does not have enough light. A black reflector would be used to take away light when there is too much shine washing out the model. A gold/silver reflector is for the happy medium, but find what works best for you and best for the situation in general.

Avoid Or Reduce Red Eye

It can be noted here that the only important thing is that the users must ensure that the proper fixing of the angle between the flash beam and the lens axis. The general rule here is that the photographer must keep the angle wide enough that the light beam from the flash does not reflect off the retina of the person being photographed and comes right back into the digital camera lens. A good idea is to make the red-eye reduction work by making the flash shine a light into the eyes of the person being photographed just before the flash is incident and the shutter is pressed. This causes the irises in the eyes of the person being photographed to narrow down or shrink. As a result of this the eye develops a smaller opening for the eye view of the digital camera and does not show off the blood filled retina. This light is called pre light! And very importantly this process works only if the person to be photographed is in point of fact looking directly at the flash for the pre-light to come.

Other factors influencing the red eye are the level of ambient light during the time when the photograph is being taken and how near the flash light is to the lens. The rule of thumb comes out that the brighter the ambient light; the lesser is the effect of red eyes, everything else being one and the same. As the flashlight goes farther from the lens, the fewer becomes the effect of red eyes, everything else being one and the same again. Thus the key idea is that red eye is not caused if the ambient light is comparatively high. And it does have a significant effect if the shooting area is dark. Many digital cameras have built in features for anti red eye that is used to reduce red eye when taking a picture of a person looking straight at the camera also. But manually, the best red eye reduction can be obtained with the help of an external flash as described.

The above discussion has dealt with the most important ideas regarding the red eye effect. The discussion has analyzed the inherent facts about the digital camera red eye effect, their causes as well as remedies. The only thing that remains is that the users must implement these ideas while shooting under circumstances discussed here so that the red eye effect cannot harm the beauties of art created with the aid of the fantastic device, the digital camera!

Pet Portrait Artist to Stand Out

When contracting with the pet lover for the commission, offer extras for a set additional fee. For instance:

1. Offer sale of your original sketches of their pet, or the draft that you worked from for the finished portrait.

2. If you mat the piece, offer a remarque, a bit of original work on the mat–possibly a simple line rendering of the subject in the portrait or of their pet’s favorite toys or pastime.

3. Offer to take a quality photo of the piece, from which you print note cards for the pet owner.

4. If you commission pet photography, offer a matted collage or a small album of all of the proof size photographs in addition to the finished piece.

Offer these options prior to creating the work, but if the buyers refuses, don’t forget to offer them a second opportunity to purchase them when you finish the piece. At that time, they are often so pleased with the result that they are grateful to have the opportunity to own these sentimental additions to the finished piece. I’ve listed just a few ideas to get you started. Now come up with even more artistic ideas of your own!