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Monthly Archives: February 2018

Get the Perfect Exposure

The problem is that you didn’t expose your film properly.

Whether we use a digital or film camera, we need to be able to calculate exposure properly. But first, we need to understand how the aperture and the shutter work together. We also need to know how film handles light, and the relationship between film light sensitivity and f/stops.

Lets take a quick look at the main elements.

Aperture and f/stops: the aperture is an opening in the centre of the lens through which light passes. The amount of light which passes through an aperture is indicated by f/stops. The lower the f/stop the more light that passes through the aperture. Opening up one full f/stop doubles the amount of light entering the camera. F/4 admits twice the light of f5.6.

Shutter: the shutter is a mechanical device that controls the length of time that light is allowed to act on the film. Each time you open the shutter by one, we double the light, when we close down the light by one we half the light. Opening the shutter at 1 second allows twice the light as that of a ½ second.

ISO (ASA): stands for International Standards Organisation. The initials are used for film speed which rates light sensitivity. A film with an ISO number 100 is twice as light sensitive as a film with an ISO of 50. The faster the film, the more sensitive it is to light.

Most digital SLR have ISO settings built in to them. If you are taking a low light image with a digital camera use a slow ISO rating of 200 or upwards.

Getting the perfect exposure isn’t easy, but there are several different ways of making it easier.

Using a light meter: there are two types of light meters,

1. Reflected-light meter (the same that is built into your camera) works by pointing the meter at your subject.

2. Incident-light meter: instead of pointing the meter at your subject, you stand beside the subject and point the meter at the camera. The light that falls on your subject will also fall on your meter.

The most common way is to use the meter built into your camera. All modern day cameras have a reflected-light meter built in to them. But don’t point the camera directly at your subject from 10 meters. This will more than likely underexpose your image. Take the exposure reading up-close, then return to the starting position and take your image.

It doesn’t matter which metering system we use, if we don’t point them in the right direction our images will return too dark or too bright. The key is to know where to point the meter.

All about Exposure Compensation

Looking at different digital cameras, even temperately costing digital cameras have arrangements for exposure compensation settings. To explain in a bit detail, the exposure compensation allows the users to control the amount of light entering the lens. And thereby the illumination of the photograph is decided. Exposure compensation can be altered manually or by the help of a digital camera’s exposure compensation setting that lets one override the metered exposure set inside the digital camera itself. Strictly speaking, the exposure values provide an expedient line of attack to put a figure on the available light intensity and therefore exposure.

As per general norms of the users of digital cameras, certain standards exist for selecting such values. These values are specifically known as Exposure Values (EV). Selecting an up to standard Exposure Values (EV) helps maintain the details contained in dark areas of a photo, or diminish the more than usually bright areas. Again, looking from technical point of view, the Exposure Values are numbers that refer to an assortment of combinations of apertures of lenses and shutter speed respectively. They have a selective range of values, ranging between -2 to +2 Exposure Values (EV). As a general rule positive exposure settings are used for cases where bulky areas of a scene are especially bright such as taking pictures of a snow scene and also during times of photographing when the background is a good deal brighter than the focal area under consideration. Also, negative exposure settings are used for cases where bulky areas of a scene are especially dark and also during times of photographing when the background is a good deal darker than the fore area under consideration.

One point that is worth noting is that light meters cannot see color. They deliver every scene as 18% middle gray and become accustomed to the exposure accordingly. And most digital cameras will allows a photographer to compensate the exposure by 1 to 2 EV plus or minus in 1/3 or 1/2 stop increments. A very important realization for any photographer is that the right exposure is only “correct” in the eye of the photographer; Exposure Value compensation can also be used as a creative tool.

Info of Candid Photography

Candid photos are usually simple photos without a lot of technical equipment or any time taken ‘setting up the shot’. Thus they capture some wonderful ‘slices of life’!

Here are some tips for taking candid photos:

– Take your camera everywhere you go! Keep alert for candid situations – they can be found everywhere.

– Some examples of candid shots: A daydreaming store owner; an elderly man sitting beside you; commuters waiting for a train; two lovers on a park bench about to kiss; a child’s delight when feeding ducks; elation of a football supporter when a goal is scored; a city tramp surrounded by clutter; a woman lost in thought staring at the beach.

– It’s rare to get a second chance with candid photography. When you see an opportunity, grab it!

– Don’t use complicated lighting techniques for taking your candid shots. Concentrate on the simple and use your camera’s automatic features. Technical problems don’t matter so much if you have a great candid photo. Most technical problems (like if the image is too dark or too light) can be fixed on your computer.

– Set your camera to “ISO 400” so it uses a fast shutter speed. This will help you ‘grab’ the shot even if you are moving.

– The best candid photographers blend into the background so don’t be too obvious. Do what everyone else is doing so you fit in with the situation. Then when you see a good candid moment, bring your camera up to your eye.

– You don’t always need to take the shot with your camera at eye level. Support your camera on your waist when taking the photo. Some luck or experience is needed here to get the framing right.

– Use your zoom lens to it’s fullest extent so you can keep away from the action while taking your shot. A Telephoto lens is essential if you’re going to be a fair way away.

– Never take photos of people’s backs. Nothing is more boring than a group of people with all backs turned to the camera. It just doesn’t work.

– Try converting the image to Black and White to get that extra punch and emotion.

– People ‘doing things’ make the best candid photos. Sports players, trades people, farmers and accountants are all excellent examples of subjects with ‘things to do’. Try to capture the essence of the person’s task. For example, you might capture a plumber concentrating on fixing a leaky pipe.

– If you’re in a public place, it’s usually okay to photograph people. If they object however, you need to stop. If you’re not sure, it never hurts to ask permission before hand. Your subject may want to pose, so explain what you saw them doing and ask them to continue as if you weren’t there.

Flash Photo Albums

Wondershare Flash SlideShow Builder is a powerful easy-to-use utility to create stunning Flash slideshows from your still photo images, complete with music, photo motion & transition effects and special photo album templates. With this Flash Slideshow software, you can take your own digital photos and music, and easily turn them into an engaging Flash slide show or Flash photo album in minutes to share your special memories with your friends and family.

>> Key Features:

1) A wide variety of slideshow transition & photo motion effects for your customization.

2) Real time and flexible preview on every step.

3) Rich and professional templates to make your slideshow more lively. And they are absolutely free for you to download.

4) Integrate with photo browsing function.

5) Reduce Flash File Size.

6) Photo Editing and Optimizing.

7) Publish your Flash slideshows as SWF, HTML, EXE file for easily sharing.

8) Very easy to use, no Flash experience required!

Album Creator Pro is the unique software to create digital photo album in Flash and HTML image galleries. It combines plenty of useful features such as an incredible amount of customization, intuitive interface, FTP support, possibility to enhance your photos. And on the top of that we give you a great chance to be truly creative – to compose albums with exclusive design.

Amara Flash Photo Slide show Software is a Flash album creator to help the web designer to create and design animated Flash slide-shows. The software is compatible with all popular graphic file and audio formats. Amara Flash Slideshow Builder allows you to design compelling animated Flash photo galleries from your digital camera pictures. It saves your settings. All your personal settings for pictures, URL links, colors, & sound are automatically loaded the next time. And you can also easily change and update them. Amara Flash slide show builder is extremely user-friendly. The user interface guides you through the quick and easy steps and you will understand how it works immediately.