This is default featured slide 1 title
This is default featured slide 2 title
This is default featured slide 3 title
This is default featured slide 4 title
This is default featured slide 5 title
 

Category Archives: Photography

Info of Candid Photography

Candid photos are usually simple photos without a lot of technical equipment or any time taken ‘setting up the shot’. Thus they capture some wonderful ‘slices of life’!

Here are some tips for taking candid photos:

– Take your camera everywhere you go! Keep alert for candid situations – they can be found everywhere.

– Some examples of candid shots: A daydreaming store owner; an elderly man sitting beside you; commuters waiting for a train; two lovers on a park bench about to kiss; a child’s delight when feeding ducks; elation of a football supporter when a goal is scored; a city tramp surrounded by clutter; a woman lost in thought staring at the beach.

– It’s rare to get a second chance with candid photography. When you see an opportunity, grab it!

– Don’t use complicated lighting techniques for taking your candid shots. Concentrate on the simple and use your camera’s automatic features. Technical problems don’t matter so much if you have a great candid photo. Most technical problems (like if the image is too dark or too light) can be fixed on your computer.

– Set your camera to “ISO 400” so it uses a fast shutter speed. This will help you ‘grab’ the shot even if you are moving.

– The best candid photographers blend into the background so don’t be too obvious. Do what everyone else is doing so you fit in with the situation. Then when you see a good candid moment, bring your camera up to your eye.

– You don’t always need to take the shot with your camera at eye level. Support your camera on your waist when taking the photo. Some luck or experience is needed here to get the framing right.

– Use your zoom lens to it’s fullest extent so you can keep away from the action while taking your shot. A Telephoto lens is essential if you’re going to be a fair way away.

– Never take photos of people’s backs. Nothing is more boring than a group of people with all backs turned to the camera. It just doesn’t work.

– Try converting the image to Black and White to get that extra punch and emotion.

– People ‘doing things’ make the best candid photos. Sports players, trades people, farmers and accountants are all excellent examples of subjects with ‘things to do’. Try to capture the essence of the person’s task. For example, you might capture a plumber concentrating on fixing a leaky pipe.

– If you’re in a public place, it’s usually okay to photograph people. If they object however, you need to stop. If you’re not sure, it never hurts to ask permission before hand. Your subject may want to pose, so explain what you saw them doing and ask them to continue as if you weren’t there.

Flash Photo Albums

Wondershare Flash SlideShow Builder is a powerful easy-to-use utility to create stunning Flash slideshows from your still photo images, complete with music, photo motion & transition effects and special photo album templates. With this Flash Slideshow software, you can take your own digital photos and music, and easily turn them into an engaging Flash slide show or Flash photo album in minutes to share your special memories with your friends and family.

>> Key Features:

1) A wide variety of slideshow transition & photo motion effects for your customization.

2) Real time and flexible preview on every step.

3) Rich and professional templates to make your slideshow more lively. And they are absolutely free for you to download.

4) Integrate with photo browsing function.

5) Reduce Flash File Size.

6) Photo Editing and Optimizing.

7) Publish your Flash slideshows as SWF, HTML, EXE file for easily sharing.

8) Very easy to use, no Flash experience required!

Album Creator Pro is the unique software to create digital photo album in Flash and HTML image galleries. It combines plenty of useful features such as an incredible amount of customization, intuitive interface, FTP support, possibility to enhance your photos. And on the top of that we give you a great chance to be truly creative – to compose albums with exclusive design.

Amara Flash Photo Slide show Software is a Flash album creator to help the web designer to create and design animated Flash slide-shows. The software is compatible with all popular graphic file and audio formats. Amara Flash Slideshow Builder allows you to design compelling animated Flash photo galleries from your digital camera pictures. It saves your settings. All your personal settings for pictures, URL links, colors, & sound are automatically loaded the next time. And you can also easily change and update them. Amara Flash slide show builder is extremely user-friendly. The user interface guides you through the quick and easy steps and you will understand how it works immediately.

Colors Theory

Primary Colors

Many of us know about the primary shades, we all have learnt about them in school. They are the colors that can’t be made by mixing two colors, they are primary colors of a color wheel. While a standard artist color wheel makes use of red, yellow and blue as primary colors many photographers think regarding RBG (red, blue and green) color spectrum.

Secondary Shades

Secondary colors are a result of the mixing of primary colors. On the photographers color wheel, these shades are orange, purple and green.

Tertiary Hues

Tertiary colors are created by combining the secondary and primary shades. For instance, when using the first yellow, blue and red hues wheel mixing the orange and red or green and blue would result in tertiary hues.

Complementary Shades

One of the most common links is between the additional hues. Complementary colors fall in the opposite from one another on the color board. These colors develop high contrast and grab the viewer attention.

Analogous Colors

Analogous hues are next to each other on the wheel. Making use of similar shades create a more harmonious shade scheme and low-contrast.

Monochromatic Hues

The monochromes are usually referred as black and white; monochromatic shades are made from hues of just one hue, for example, several different tones of blue. Monochromatic shades are low in contrast and usually create a soothing look.

 

Peek At Photo Frames

Types of photo frames.

· Wooden frames, these are perhaps the oldest of the available photo frames, they are made of wood that has been joined at the corners to form a shape that acts as a structural reinforcement to a photo. The wooden types are simple and readily available. The other advantage with them is that they are resistance to damages like breakages and abrasion.

· Glass frames, these are the most modern of the photo frames they are made from glass and often are of limited small sizes due to their weight and fragility. Glass frames offer elegant displays due to the transparent nature of glass creating and a seamless illusion that makes the photo to be the center of attraction.

· Acrylic photo frames, acrylic is a synthetic material that produces glass-like equipment used in different manufacturing processes. In frames, acrylic is the best since they are like glass frames only that they are light and do not readily break. This, therefore, means that these frames are

· Metal frames, these are metallic structures, and they are rare due to challenges like weight and cost. Rarely do people prefer metallic frames unless they intend to display photos outside where weather elements are a factor and require larger displays like billboards.

· Other types of frames include those that are temporarily used as photo frames, such as, the plastic and reed woven structures.

Ideal Frames for Photo Display

From the above-detailed classification, the perfect photo frames are the acrylic frames. This is because they are a classical way to have your photo display as well as they have superior merits over the glass frames. These frames are available in different shapes and different sizes making them the most ideal.

Info of Creating Portraits

Props should be kept to a minimum. Allowable is anything which will support the mood and which will not detract from the main subject. A high key portrait can be enhanced with a white wicker chair, a loose white flower arrangement out of focus in the background or a high-keyed landscape judiciously placed off center, blending with the other background tones. A large, dark sculptured bowl of red apples, a black poodle, or a dark-toned piece of furniture in the background would contrast too sharply with the generally light toned subject and background. Attention diverted to these items due to their strong intrusion in the composition is lost to the main subject and detracts from the ambiance.

Attention should be paid to the lines created by the subject and other components in the composition. Lines leading strongly out of the picture should be avoided. Rather use curves to bring the eye back to the main subject. Moveable items in the composition can be place to complete gap in a leading line so as to facilitate the eye in its movement around the work. Invisible paths of light can be created with the use of similar colors, a repeated pattern or item, or the play of light and shadow along an edge. Where possible choose components with care, preferring meaningful items which play a part in the life of the subject, rather than an object chosen solely for its shape and color. For instance, if the subject is a potter, choose an attractive urn instead of, say, an antique doll which has no place in the subject’s interests.

The light that falls on the subject can be used to support the mood. Natural window light suggests an old master genre and the sharp golden rays of a small source of light created the highlights necessary for a mood with a positive spin. Any available light can create a beautiful portrait if the direction and ration of light to dark is controlled. Reflectors add light to a dark, shadowed area, scrims or shades can tone down a too-strong source. The direction or the main source of light should enhance the features by sending light into the eyes, outlining the jaw and cheek, and finding the proper areas to highlight. Additional highlights are supplied with back or side-back rays of light, as long as their effect does not invent unwanted facial highlights or block up needed detail. Pure rim lighting is fairly safe if used with care.

Low Light and Night

Well, you will need a camera as well as charged batteries, that’s for sure. Also, a tripod is invaluable for exposures lasting greater than 1/30th second (1/60th in some cases). A torch, a decent lens and think about a remote shutter release – using long shutter speeds means the potential for camera shake and blurred images is even greater than usual (the alternative is to use a self timing mechanism to trip the shutter).

Night time often means scenes lit with artificial light. This will inevitably give a colour cast to your shots although this can be pleasing sometimes. There are many types of lighting (tungsten, halogen, fluorescent) and they will all come out with different colour casts – live with it! Try different white balance settings to see what effect it has on the final image.

This can be difficult. But with modern digital cameras you can see the results immediately and therefore make any adjustments straight away. Your meter may lie! Be ready to change the settings (and give a longer exposure). Night time shots can be very contrasty (bright lights and deep shadows) – the camera won’t be able to cope with the extremities of exposure so just change the settings yourself until you are happy with the results! You may need to use the “B” or “Bulb” setting to hold your shutter open for long periods.

Virtually anything! The choices are almost limitless. We suggest you consider:

Buildings

Lights

Signs

Bridges

Cars / vehicles

Lit houses / pubs / shops

People (motion blur can be a useful effect)

Street illuminations

Fireworks

Bonfires

Fairgrounds

Reflections in lakes, pools

Look around for other ideas. Don’t forget if there is any light at all, it can be turned into an image.

To calculate exposures you can use a rule of thumb – see below for rough examples of exposure times. However, each circumstance will require a different approach so you can expect to adjust things frequently!

Night (assume f16 ISO 100)

Town / City 20 sec

Signs / Lights 2 secs

Streets 20 secs

Streets 20 secs

Churches 30 sec

Fairgrounds 10 – 15 secs

Candlelight 60 secs

Fireworks 1 – 60 secs

One interesting aspect of night photography is the recording of moving trails of light. Cars, buses, trains, bikes will have bright headlights and tail lights which will record as trails across your image if you shoot them whilst they are moving with a slow shutter speed of anything from 2 – 20 seconds. Try it! The same goes for fairground rides. And don’t forget that you can create your own trails with statically lit objects by zooming in or our during a long exposure or even panning the tripod head.

Bracketing

By taking a shot of a scene with, say, as stop of under exposure and a stop of over exposure, you will be more likely to capture an image that is correctly exposed. Bright lights tells the camera to underexpose. Many cameras will have automatic exposure bracketing to allow this to be done with minimal fuss! You are trying to record some detail in the shadows without burning out the highlights. If you take an image of a scene at 4 second exposure, take the same scene with 8 seconds and 2 seconds. In this way you will be likely to get the exposure you are looking for.

Overexposing and Underexposing

Ways to correct underexposure:

• Add more light to your canvas. One of the more simple ways of doing this is actually just turning your flash on, that is what it is there for so use it. Another way is by adding a reflector; this will help keep the lighting in the photo in a way that adds more definition to the scene or image.
• Adjusting your f/stop could very well be the problem too. Changing this will allow more light exposure to the photo, so just play with it until you find the right f/stop.
• Or change your shutter speed while keeping the f/stop the same. I only recommend doing this if you have a model that is not moving and you are using a trip pod. Switching your shutter speed from 1/60 of a second to 1/30 can really make a noticeable difference; it might feel like it’s only changing a millisecond but that period of time can make all the difference!

Overexposure is exactly the opposite of underexposure, you are letting too much light be recorded by the camera and that is causing the photo to be ‘blown out’ or ‘white washed’. When this happens, you lose a lot of the color in the photo and it can be too distracting to see what the photographer was trying to create. Some people overexpose on purpose to allow more details to emerge on a dark object and setting, but typically overexposing is not a good thing. Just like the definition of overexposing is the opposite of underexposing, the ways to correct overexposing are also the opposite.

• Take away light by moving to the shade or using a darker reflector. A darker reflector will absorb some of the access light, therefore, helping your photo from getting blah-looking. If you cannot find shade then find a cloth or something to block direct sunlight.
• Try changing your f/stop. Play around with it and get closer to f/11, see what works for the shot and use it.
• Shutter speed is another option. Move it up this time, go to 1/125 to let less light in to your sensor or film plane.

Get Ready for A Studio Photoshoot

The main light has to be placed in a very specific position in comparison to the model. The angle, height, and distance of the main light are vital to getting the right look. You do not want this light in the models eyes or from a side angle. It also needs to be placed at a good height so you are not casting shadows on the models face. With this light you need to use a diffuser or a soft box to help decrease the darkness of the shadows in the picture.

A hair light is a second light that sits in a specific position. Basically, the hair light is placed behind the model for a few reasons. To use this light correctly attach a snoot to it. A snoot is an attachment to the light that helps direct the light to a specific spot on the model; in this case it is for the hair.

The camera, you need to connect your camera with the studio lights so everything flashes in the right connections. There are a couple of was to handle the camera for a photo shoot. One of the ways is to put it on a tripod and keep the camera stationary. By doing that you will help eliminate blur and you can find a sweet spot to stay at. Another way is by just holding the camera and creating different angles while the shoot is happening.

The reflector is used to bounce light onto the models features from the main light. There are a few different types of reflector; you could use a white, black, gold and silver colored reflector. You would want to use a white reflector when the area you are taking a picture in does not have enough light. A black reflector would be used to take away light when there is too much shine washing out the model. A gold/silver reflector is for the happy medium, but find what works best for you and best for the situation in general.

Avoid Or Reduce Red Eye

It can be noted here that the only important thing is that the users must ensure that the proper fixing of the angle between the flash beam and the lens axis. The general rule here is that the photographer must keep the angle wide enough that the light beam from the flash does not reflect off the retina of the person being photographed and comes right back into the digital camera lens. A good idea is to make the red-eye reduction work by making the flash shine a light into the eyes of the person being photographed just before the flash is incident and the shutter is pressed. This causes the irises in the eyes of the person being photographed to narrow down or shrink. As a result of this the eye develops a smaller opening for the eye view of the digital camera and does not show off the blood filled retina. This light is called pre light! And very importantly this process works only if the person to be photographed is in point of fact looking directly at the flash for the pre-light to come.

Other factors influencing the red eye are the level of ambient light during the time when the photograph is being taken and how near the flash light is to the lens. The rule of thumb comes out that the brighter the ambient light; the lesser is the effect of red eyes, everything else being one and the same. As the flashlight goes farther from the lens, the fewer becomes the effect of red eyes, everything else being one and the same again. Thus the key idea is that red eye is not caused if the ambient light is comparatively high. And it does have a significant effect if the shooting area is dark. Many digital cameras have built in features for anti red eye that is used to reduce red eye when taking a picture of a person looking straight at the camera also. But manually, the best red eye reduction can be obtained with the help of an external flash as described.

The above discussion has dealt with the most important ideas regarding the red eye effect. The discussion has analyzed the inherent facts about the digital camera red eye effect, their causes as well as remedies. The only thing that remains is that the users must implement these ideas while shooting under circumstances discussed here so that the red eye effect cannot harm the beauties of art created with the aid of the fantastic device, the digital camera!

Pet Portrait Artist to Stand Out

When contracting with the pet lover for the commission, offer extras for a set additional fee. For instance:

1. Offer sale of your original sketches of their pet, or the draft that you worked from for the finished portrait.

2. If you mat the piece, offer a remarque, a bit of original work on the mat–possibly a simple line rendering of the subject in the portrait or of their pet’s favorite toys or pastime.

3. Offer to take a quality photo of the piece, from which you print note cards for the pet owner.

4. If you commission pet photography, offer a matted collage or a small album of all of the proof size photographs in addition to the finished piece.

Offer these options prior to creating the work, but if the buyers refuses, don’t forget to offer them a second opportunity to purchase them when you finish the piece. At that time, they are often so pleased with the result that they are grateful to have the opportunity to own these sentimental additions to the finished piece. I’ve listed just a few ideas to get you started. Now come up with even more artistic ideas of your own!